Tag Archives: Climate policy

The politics of climate change – where are we?

Bryan Walsh’s piece on Al Gore’s reality versus everyone else’s in Time magazine is an excellent precis of the current politics of climate change. He even gets the UK picture about right; the default position for US environmental writers is to assume European climate policy is a done deal. That said, Continue reading

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Filed under Climate deniers, Public opinion, UK politics

The Battle of the 4th Budget

So, the epic battle in the UK over the Fourth Carbon Budget (2023-2027) is now over and the dust is settling. The issue was whether to approve the Climate Change Committee’s recommendation that carbon emissions be effectively reduced to 50% of 1990 levels by the end of the period, with big implications for long-term investments, especially in the power sector.

And this was a real battle, Continue reading

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Filed under Climate policies, UK politics

The 12 commandments of climate strategy

Earlier this year, Stephen Hale – head of the UK’s Green Alliance network of companies and NGOs - left for a new life in Geneva working for Oxfam International. His parting shot was a pamphlet called The New Commandments of Climate Change Strategy: How to cut emissions and win elections too. We think that it’s very good, and didn’t get enough attention at the time, so we’re urging people to go back  and have another look.

This slightly Biblical-sounding pamphlet (is Stephen casting himself as the Moses of climate policy?) looking at what governments should do is a follow-up to his 2008 New Politics of Climate Change, which looks at what civil society should do.

Both start with an excellent Continue reading

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Filed under Climate policies, Infrastructure, UK politics

CCC: Cuts to low-carbon RD&D “detrimental”

An update on our most recent post – on Monday the UK’s independent statutory climate advisory group, the Climate Change Committee chaired by Adair Turner, brought out a new report on low carbon innovation. One of its main findings is Continue reading

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Filed under Climate policies, Innovation, UK politics